General Discussion: Property thread


Show original post
Toasted
Toasted avatar

1741 posts since 15/10/09

16 May 2022 12:14
joeyjojo wrote: Anyone have any advice to with regards to changing a residential mortgage to a buy-to-let being a non uk resident? Most of the places I’ve looked at expect you to be a resident.
Also any recommendations for brokers/ advisors that may be able to help in this situation?

This is not a recommendation but we just didn't disclose to our lender when we let out the house we had been living in when we moved.
toocan
toocan avatar

892 posts since 7/11/07

16 May 2022 13:03
Don't mean to put a downer on it but that's in breach of your mortgage terms (heavily FCA regulated)… If your tenant wanted to be a dick for whatever reason or someone else did - an ex or other, its a sure-fire way to have your credit record fucked for a long period of time and suffer some financial penalties from your lender + penalties… Messy just swap it imo
eazypz
eazypz avatar

3680 posts since 16/4/10

posted 16 May 2022 13:51, edited 16 May 2022 13:51
BTL mortgage usually requires minimum 25% equity, so if you don’t have they already you’d have to lump in more.

Know someone who was in the same situation, spoke to the bank and told them they couldn’t afford the mortgage anymore due to losing their job, so asked if they could rent it out to cover the mortgage.
Bank obliged and switched it with no extra equity required.

This was pre-pandemic though so not sure what’s changed since.
joeyjojo
joeyjojo avatar

4715 posts since 24/8/06

16 May 2022 14:37
Thanks guys for the responses but specifically just looking into the ‘non resident’ part. I’m considering doing what you suggested Toasted tbh. Doubt anyone would find out and not bothered about my credit score etc in UK as won’t live there again ( maybe )
sydneyking
sydneyking avatar

5227 posts since 26/9/09

16 May 2022 14:48
eazypz wrote: BTL mortgage usually requires minimum 25% equity, so if you don’t have they already you’d have to lump in more.

Know someone who was in the same situation, spoke to the bank and told them they couldn’t afford the mortgage anymore due to losing their job, so asked if they could rent it out to cover the mortgage.
Bank obliged and switched it with no extra equity required.

This was pre-pandemic though so not sure what’s changed since.

Was that a legit case of losing their job? seems an extreme response to potentially being out of work for a couple of months
eazypz
eazypz avatar

3680 posts since 16/4/10

16 May 2022 16:32
sydneyking wrote:
eazypz wrote: BTL mortgage usually requires minimum 25% equity, so if you don’t have they already you’d have to lump in more.

Know someone who was in the same situation, spoke to the bank and told them they couldn’t afford the mortgage anymore due to losing their job, so asked if they could rent it out to cover the mortgage.
Bank obliged and switched it with no extra equity required.

This was pre-pandemic though so not sure what’s changed since.

Was that a legit case of losing their job? seems an extreme response to potentially being out of work for a couple of months

No, just wanted a BTL mortgage.
From what I recall, said he’d been out of work for six months already and couldn’t continue to pay the mortgage, hence renting.
swede
swede avatar

10519 posts since 21/3/09

16 May 2022 17:43
joeyjojo wrote: not bothered about my credit score etc in UK as won’t live there again ( maybe )

Ubercool
Razorlight123
Razorlight123 avatar

5119 posts since 13/1/10

posted 27 May 2022 16:31, edited 27 May 2022 16:31
For those that are able to log in, I need some advice regarding a dispute.

Be prepared for a long read…:

I needed an architect to draw building reg plans for a rear extension, as we have successfully received approval from council.

We got in touch with an architect that said he will be able to do the building reg drawings for £400, but it's dependant on the reliability of the drawings we submitted to our council for approval. Sent those to him, and he came back with the accuracy seems 'poor', his basis of that was due to the elevation drawings, which in all honesty isn't bad - and again has been used in previous council planning approvals (see image he provided as a basis to confirm as 'poor')

As a result, he said he can still do the building reg drawings for £400 based on the plans that we already have, but he would prefer and advise for him to do his own measured survey to redraw the existing plans and elevations accurately. However this would be a further £200.

The main reason that he proposed the redrawing is that because the approved extension is over 3m, he believes there could be issues, so he proposed a different style of roof, and due to the clearly inaccurate drawings he cannot accurately calculate whether the roof will work. We confirmed that a neighbour has the same roof that we submitted for approval, but happy to discuss his proposal further.

I responded with a negotiation of the price, and requested a date to survey the property. I received no response to my email. I sent a text message confirming I have responded to his email, and is xyz date okay. We confirmed a date via text, but did not confirm the price.

So he arrived, and we discussed the issues he raised re: original drawings and roof proposal. We essentially rejected the roof design proposed, and stated as a result we will be sticking with the originally approved plans, and confirmed we will only require the building reg drawings as a result.

He proceeds to do some measurements of the ground floor only, and said he will have things sorted in a couple of weeks time. That he would require 25% before he can begin any work on the drawings.

My mistake here is that I forgot to re-confirm the cost in person during the meeting given that we were no longer redrawing the plans, i.e. the additional £200. Unfortunately, he had just left before I realised. So I sent a text message immediately stating:

"As discussed, we will just go with the building regulation drawings - could you confirm the cost for this?"

He responded with:

"Building regulation drawings and specification document will be £600.
As discussed if you could arrange 25% payment to begin drawing work please."

I re-confirmed that we discussed we no longer need to re-draw the plans.


There's been alot of back and forth since, recent message from him stated:

"I have already spent time and money on conducting and drawing the survey so it would be in both our interests for me to complete the job."

Which I don't understand, as there was a stipulation that works won't begin until a deposit was made.

The guy seems unreasonable, had he stated, there seems to have been a misunderstanding, that's fine, please just pay 25% to cover travel expenses for example, I'd have been inclined to.

The £200 according to him was to:
- measure property
- Redraw the plans
- Redraw the elevations

He didn't measure the entire property, so how would he redraw the elevations?!

mtthrvy2
mtthrvy2 avatar

1988 posts since 8/11/10

27 May 2022 20:36
I dont know anything about building reg drawings but that drawing looks nothing like your house..

I think you need to work out your main issue is here, is it the poor communication? Do you trust him to do a good job? Was he recommended etc? My main concern would be that he didn't take any measurements.


Kadafi39
Kadafi39 avatar

2187 posts since 30/10/09

31 May 2022 14:41
mtthrvy2 wrote: I dont know anything about building reg drawings but that drawing looks nothing like your house..

I think you need to work out your main issue is here, is it the poor communication? Do you trust him to do a good job? Was he recommended etc? My main concern would be that he didn't take any measurements.

Dont think its supposed to be an existing plan, rather a proposed after works have been carried out Laughing out loud
mtthrvy2
mtthrvy2 avatar

1988 posts since 8/11/10

posted 5 Jun 2022 16:51, edited 5 Jun 2022 16:51
Kadafi39 wrote:
mtthrvy2 wrote: I dont know anything about building reg drawings but that drawing looks nothing like your house..

I think you need to work out your main issue is here, is it the poor communication? Do you trust him to do a good job? Was he recommended etc? My main concern would be that he didn't take any measurements.

Dont think its supposed to be an existing plan, rather a proposed after works have been carried out Laughing out loud

so the extension plan is to make the bay windows smaller as well as the gable (or whatever it's called) and put a taller door on the side entrance and change the roof pitch?

I figured the front elevation was just shown as an example and the extension is out the back..
Razorlight123
Razorlight123 avatar

5119 posts since 13/1/10

posted 5 Jun 2022 17:39, edited 5 Jun 2022 17:39
No, mtthrvy2 you're correct, when you analyse the existing front elevation closely - it is off!

Nevertheless, the floorplan measures are correct, and have been verified by others.

Kadafi39
Kadafi39 avatar

2187 posts since 30/10/09

6 Jun 2022 10:04
The plan is supposed to be an existing plan? That's not even close, as mtthryv said the gables smaller, you've lost bay windows, pitch on the roof is different, the porch and the roof on the porch are different and finally your side lean to has been accidentally extended to the front of the house.
Rirawin
Rirawin avatar

9651 posts since 17/7/05

17 Jun 2022 14:29
Any heating engineers here? Just had an offer accepted on a property and the current boiler in situ is over 30 years old Laughing out loud has a water tank too. Looking to have the whole lot replaced but thinking whether to go down the heat pump route or a boiler that can take a mix of hydrogen gas and natural gas, with the view to having it modified to fully hydrogen gas when that becomes more "widely available" in a few years time. I can see the benefit of heat pumps as it's not beholden to external producers, that hydrogen gas is like natural gas. Thoughts or opinions? Or any other options that I should be considering?
andymakesglasses
andymakesglasses avatar

20740 posts since 26/1/06

posted 19 Jun 2022 09:55, edited 19 Jun 2022 09:55
Had similar conversations with a few heating engineers recently (our gas boiler is around 15 to 20 years old and not very efficient).

The consensus was that heat pumps aren't quite there yet, particularly when it comes to installation in non-new houses. The house needs to be very well draught-proofed and insulated for the lower heat output to get the house up to a decent temperature, and you'll need to replace your radiators for more efficient models.

With a heat pump you're still beholden to external producers as you need electricity to run it. Currently the typical running costs are around the same, heat pump vs gas boiler. To make the most benefit from a heat pump you'd ideally be generating your own electricity, so installing photovoltaic panels. To make the most of photovoltaic panels you ideally need a battery (you can actually use your Tesla as a battery for the house).

I'm not sure about England but in Scotland you can get a government loan for buying renewables kit. The loan can cover the cost of the photovoltaic panels and is paid back over 15 years, which roughly works out at a similar monthly cost to your electricity bill, so it's not actually saving you anything but is potentially setting you up for the future, if you stay in the same house for 15+ years and if the panels are still working well after that time.

Short answer, heat pumps could be the answer but only as part of a joined up "big picture" system, and future Government policy isn't clear. In a few years things might be clearer (and cheaper).

These are some links that I found useful when looking into it:

https://octopus.energy/blog/heat-pump-running-costs/

https://www.edfenergy.com/heating/advice/air-source-heat-pump-guide

https://www.greenmatch.co.uk/blog/2014/08/the-running-costs-of-heat-pumps (old link but still has useful comparisons)

The engineers we spoke to were of differing opinions as to the solution. One was in favour of heat pumps but only if splashing the cash on everything else to go with it. Another was in favour of replacing the boiler with another gas one and converting it to hydrogen down the line if that becomes a thing. The third recommended continuing to run our current boiler since there's nothing actually wrong with it, then making a decision further down the line when something forces our hand and when the Government policy is clearer.
Dee
Dee avatar

12200 posts since 22/11/07

19 Jun 2022 16:00
I'm considering the air source heat pump route, place is fully electric and very well insulated but the current system (Fischer) is returning an annual electricity bill of circa 3K, and the hot water system isn't ideal as it only serves the taps. A return to a water tank has to be on the cards so we can remove the electric shower and install a bath with an additional bathroom/shower.

The prob we have is we plan on extending the front of the house (sealed the planning with some foundations) but we are putting it off for 2 or 3 years and I want to install new floors and update the bathroom to the back of the house first, they badly need putting right. Need to find a way to pull that off with minimal disruption with the future extension.

Poss wet underfloor heating with a heat pump, new water cylinder with an option to add solar and battery, but we need planning permission for the solar as it's a flat roof in a greenbelt area. Bit of a head fuck to deal with but that's the thinking so far, hoping technology improves fairly soon and waiting to see what Tesla does with the Powerwall. It all looks expensive!

If you can insulate to the right level then heat pumps are probably the best option, using the current grants, I also wouldn't be surprised if future tax policies shift weight towards gas.
Rirawin
Rirawin avatar

9651 posts since 17/7/05

19 Jun 2022 16:50
Ta both.

Yeah would love to go full electric, pv panels and a powerwall or similar. Been reading that some have two powerwalls as they can generate a lot of surplus energy even in the UK. You can then go off grid or run the house for a day or two if there’s a power cut. Of course it’s all very cash money and I personally can’t see it paying off in my life time.
Dee
Dee avatar

12200 posts since 22/11/07

19 Jun 2022 17:02
Hopefully, they can pull things off like this soon…

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/05/solar-panels-work-in-dark/
eazypz
eazypz avatar

3680 posts since 16/4/10

19 Jun 2022 20:43
Has anyone looked into a HVAC system like they do in the US, that does heating and AC?

Have no knowledge of it but it’s weird that we don’t really have it here domestically?
ginner
ginner avatar

356 posts since 15/4/14

20 Jun 2022 08:14
You still need a boiler for your hot water so a combi boiler will do your heating and hot water in the uk for most houses. You also need a fairly airtight house for it to work well, which most UK houses aren't. If its pretty new, or has new windows/doors and good insulation in the loft space (current building regs spec as a minimum) then it does start to work given the price of gas. Works if you have lots of PV/solar too. Payback is a long time for it and will work better in a house with fewer larger rooms. Lots of small rooms doesnt lend itself well to it really.

All in all, different house construction in US, larger houses, more extreme swings of temps in some areas and just general availability meaning costs are a bit lower all make it a more tempting prospect in the US than the UK.